What is Yoga?


The classical techniques of Yoga date back more than 5,000 years. In ancient times, the desire for greater personal freedom, health and long life, and heightened self-understanding gave birth to this system of physical and mental exercise which has since spread throughout the world. The word Yoga means "to join or yoke together," and it brings the body and mind together into one harmonious experience.

The whole system of Yoga is built on three main structures: exercise, breathing, and meditation. The exercises of Yoga are designed to put pressure on the glandular systems of the body, thereby increasing its efficiency and total health. The body is looked upon as the primary instrument that enables us to work and evolve in the world, and so a Yoga student treats it with great care and respect. Breathing techniques are based on the concept that breath is the source of life in the body. The Yoga student gently increases breath control to improve the health and function of both body and mind. These two systems of exercise and breathing then prepare the body and mind for meditation, and the student finds an easy approach to a quiet mind that allows silence and healing from everyday stress. Regular daily practice of all three parts of this structure of Yoga produce a clear, bright mind and a strong, capable body.

What types of Yoga are offered at Pure Balance?


Basics- An introduction to yoga asanas(poses), learning the proper alignment and benefits, as well as breaking down the "vinyasa", learning to work with the breath.

Hatha- Representing opposing energies, this style focuses on practicing asanas followed by counter-poses. Each asana is held while concentrating on the breath to deepen into physical balance and meditative clarity.

Vinyasa- Sanskrit word meaning "to flow". Moving from one asana to the next with each inhalation and exhalation. A style that gently builds internal heat.

Yin- A relaxing series of postures that intend to stretch the connective tissues of the body, including ligaments, bones, and joints. This is a great compliment to a yang(active) practice. These passive asanas are typically held for several minutes.


How many times a week should I practice?


Yoga is amazing-even if you only practice for one hour a week, you will experience the benefits of the practice. If you can do more than that, you will certainly experience more benefits. I suggest starting with two or three times a week, for an hour or an hour and a half each time. If you can only do 20 minutes per session, that's fine too. Don't let time constraints or unrealistic goals be an obstacle-do what you can and don't worry about it. You will likely find that after awhile your desire to practice expands naturally and you will find yourself doing more and more.

How is yoga different from stretching or any other kind of fitness?

Unlike stretching or fitness, yoga is more than just physical postures. Patanjali's eight-fold path illustrates how the physical practice is just one aspect of yoga. Even within the physical practice, yoga is unique because we connect the movement of the body and the fluctuations of the mind to the rhythm of our breath. Connecting the mind, body, and breath helps us to direct our attention inward. Through this process of inward attention, we learn to recognize our habitual thought patterns without labeling them, judging them, or trying to change them. We become more aware of our experiences from moment to moment. The awareness that we cultivate is what makes yoga a practice, rather than a task or a goal to be completed. Your body will most likely become much more flexible by doing yoga, and so will your mind.

Is yoga a religion?


Yoga is not a religion. It is a philosophy that began in India an estimated 5,000 years ago. The father of classical ashtanga yoga (the eight-limbed path, not to be confused with Sri K. Pattabhi Jois' Ashtanga yoga) is said to be Patanjali, who wrote the Yoga Sutra. These scriptures provide a framework for spiritual growth and mastery over the physical and mental body. Yoga sometimes interweaves other philosophies such as Hinduism or Buddhism, but it is not necessary to study those paths in order to practice or study yoga. It is also not necessary to surrender your own religious beliefs to practice yoga.

Who can practice yoga?

Yoga is suitable for most teens and adults of any age or physical condition. Because of the possible modifications of every class, even those with physical limitations can find a beneficial routine of Yoga. 

I'm not flexible- Can I do yoga?

Yes! You are a perfect candidate for yoga. Many people think that they need to be flexible to begin yoga, but that's a little bit like thinking that you need to be able to play tennis in order to take tennis lessons. Come as you are and you will find that yoga practice will help you become more flexible.

This newfound agility will be balanced by strength, coordination, and enhanced cardiovascular health, as well as a sense of physical confidence and overall well-being.

What do I need to begin?

All you really need to begin practicing yoga is your body, your mind, and a bit of curiosity. But it is also helpful to have a pair of sweat pants, leggings, or shorts, and a t-shirt that's not too baggy. No special footgear is required because you will be barefoot.

Why are you supposed to refrain from eating 2 to 3 hours before practice?


In yoga practice we twist from side to side, turn upside down, and bend forward and backward. If you have not fully digested your last meal, it will make itself known to you in ways that are not comfortable. If you are a person with a fast-acting digestive system and are afraid you might get hungry or feel weak during yoga class, experiment with a light snack such as yogurt, a few nuts, or juice about 30 minutes to an hour before class.

Pure Balance will continually update the schedule, so please use the Login tab for the most current classes.

Please bring your own water bottle and mat, which can also be purchased at our studio. We will provide water and towels.

lebron_james_yoga.pngLeBron James: Yoga Keeps Me Fit

Miami Heat hoops star LeBron James recently credited yoga for his peak physical performance. In an article in the Miami Herald by Joseph Goodman called "LeBron James's big 'secret': yoga," the superstar 250-pound athlete says that yoga contributes to his stamina on the court:

lebron_james_yoga_2.jpg
"Does it work for everybody? I don't know," James said Friday. "I'm not a guru about how to be in the best condition -- don't let me sit here and tell you that. But it works for me."

We can't say for sure, but we suspect that James's yoga practice might also be cultivating a mental attitude of presence. When asked about his future in the NBA, he said: "I can't live in the future, I've got to live right now." Very yogic, indeed.

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13040 Louetta Rd. #228
Cypress, TX 77429
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